Great-Grandfather Leaves County Newspaper 'Goldmine'

REED UNCOVERS WEEKLY SAGA LINE BY LINE, WEEK BY WEEK

Thursday, November 30, 2017

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Photo by Sally Carroll/McDonald County Press James Reed finds the unfolding of lives in old Pineville newspapers fascinating. Stories lay themselves out and dramas unfold. Such is the 1907 case of the murder of Clarence Mosier, a popular teacher. Charles Heath was accused of murdering the school teacher in cold blood after he tried to discipline Heath’s daughter. The case was “one of the longest and hardest fought criminal cases ever tried in Southwest Missouri.” Reed's great-grandfather edited the paper from 1883 to 1942.
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Photo by Sally Carroll/McDonald County Press James Reed finds the unfolding of lives in old Pineville newspapers fascinating. Stories lay themselves out and dramas unfold. Such is the 1907 case of the murder of Clarence Mosier, a popular teacher. Charles Heath was accused of murdering the school teacher in cold blood after he tried to discipline Heath’s daughter. The case was “one of the longest and hardest fought criminal cases ever tried in Southwest Missouri.” Reed's great-grandfather edited the paper from 1883 to 1942.

James Reed was only 12 years old when he fell in love with McDonald County.


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